Tag Archives: Gold

The Fallacy of Goldbugs or Understanding the Law of Supply and Demand

Gold Bugs

F. A. Hayek: “The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about they imagine they can design.”

 

As a preview to understand how the law of demand and supply works see Trading Places in the Pits  Hint: Are there more buyers than sellers?

Thus you can explain the fallacy of Eric Sprott’s sentiment that demand is overwhelming supply:

We see almost 60 tons a week being delivered on the Shanghai Gold Exchange. Well, you start annualizing 60 tons a week you’re talking 3,000 tons a year now. We saw 94 tons of gold go into India in September. We saw the Russian Central Bank buy 37 tons of gold in September. I mean I could come up with numbers that might suggest that we’ve got 400 tons a week of demand. And we only got 230 tons a week of mine supply. And I’ve only gotten to three data points. I haven’t even gone to the rest of the world.

We’ve now created a situation unfortunately in the market where between high frequency trading and algorithms and interference by the planers they can make things happen that looks like everything is OK. And it’s the “OK” part where I think we can really relate to gold not being allowed to go up. Because that’s the canary in the coal mine. If gold was above $2,000 we’d all be wondering: What the hell is going on here?  And so they haven’t allowed it to happen.

But by suppressing the price — and one of the great things about a price of $1,100/oz is that you can buy a lot of gold at $1,100 versus $1,900 — you can buy almost 50%-60% more gold than you could three years ago with the same amount of money. And you can buy 3x the silver. With the same amount of money!

http://www.peakprosperity.com/podcast/88731/eric-sprott-global-gold-demand-overwhelming-supply  35 minute podcast.

Of course, demand must equal supply or supply equal demand at a CLEARING PRICE.  Go to pages 137 to 138 to understand Reservation Demand (critical in understanding a high stock to flow good like gold) Man Economy and State by Rothbard

If you don’t understand price moves against you, then scream manipulation on price declines. But where was the “manipulation” from 2000 to 2011 while gold rose in price vs. the U.S. Dollar by 1,600 dollars!  You are a fool either way. You trade in a rigged market or you complain that you are buying a good that is artificially depressed. You are subsidized to buy gold at “below” market (read manipulated) prices yet you complain.

The amount that a seller will withhold on the market is termed their reservation demand. This is not, like the demand for a a good in exchange, this is a demand to hold stock.  Thus, the concept of a “demand to hold a stock of goods” will always include both demand factors, it will include the demand for the good in exchange by nonpossessors, plus the demand to hold the stock by the possessors.

I strongly suggest that if you wish to improve as an investor that you read Rothbard’s book along with the free study guide.  The implication that demand is overwhelming supply with a falling price is absurd!  Yet, Goldbugs howl incessantly that the price is being suppressed since demand is “overwhelming supply.”  Nonsense, everything equals AT A PRICE.

Did you view the video of trading places above? Where was Louis’ Reservation Demand? SELL 200 APRIL ORANGE JUICE AT 142!

Most analysts do not understand the law of supply and demand

Does the Monetary Base Drive the Gold Price?

ECB-could-buy-gold-to-revive-economy.html  Will that work?

Low UAE gold prices set off buying surge  Does that imply rising prices?

gold_MB_since2002_081014

 

Gold wasn’t always in the dumps.  It rose right along with equities, indeed outperformed equities, from the 2009 Great Recession bottom – when central banks the world over first began implementing their unconventional monetary policies – straight through to its September 2011 top.  The reason we think it did is quite simple.  Coming out of the Great Recession, central bank credibility – their ability to “pull us out” of the Recession – was being severely questioned by investors. Thus, a good portion of investor money found its way into gold. That changed in 2011. Underwritten by these same central bank easy money policies, the as yet unresolved malinvestments of the Housing Bubble turn Credit Bust turn Great Recession, which were in the process of a healthy liquidation, were short circuited, while new, yet to be revealed malinvestments (we think the largest being anything in and around financial engineering) were starting to bear fruit.  The belief took hold that the heroic policies of these central banks were finally working, finally restoring long term vitality to the economy. Gold then sunk while equities marched ever higher. So here we are…

http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelpollaro/2014/10/12/central-bank-credibility-the-equity-markets-and-gold/

Gold Bars

Buy Hatred and Fear: Kinross (Russian assets for practically free)

CEF_041114

Gold Sentiment (CEF)

The above shows the extreme negativity in the gold market. You can buy the Canadian Closed-End Fund (CEF) at a 10% to 11% discount to gold (60% of assets) and silver (40%) approximately.  Gold and silver have no counter-party risk. Such is the world of closed-end funds.  Note the 20% premiums during bull runs!

KINROSS

The absurdity of gold stock valuations is illustrated by Kinross. Consistently improving operations with $5.30 book value and with no value attributed to their Russian mine. Net-debt-to-EBITDA of 1.28 with their debt covenants being 3.5xs to 1. Cash of $879 million. 1.14 billion outstanding shares. 27 cents of operating cash flow this quarter share, up 22%. A 2.6 to 2.7 million gold equivalent oz. producer. $698 cash costs and $919 All-in Sustaining Cash Cost.  They can survive at $1,000. Below $1,000 operations would be reduced.  Of course, Kinross represents a trifecta of hatred: poor past acquisitions (declining stock price), the gold market, and some Russian assets.

Basically, the market is heavily discounting their assets because the market is assuming sub-$1,000 gold. No value given to their Russian mine.

KINROSS RESULTS 3Q 2014

110514 kinross reports 2014 third quarter results

kinross141106

You should listen to the  Kinross conference call

Mining is a crappy business

Miners at or near ALL-TIME (past 90 years) low of stock price to gold price. Part of the reason for the decoupling is the time to find new deposits and place them into production has gone from five to six years out to ten years. Mining costs hve not been kept in check until recently. Past mining managements made poor capital allocation decisions. A mine is a depleting asset! But the market has had four years to replace managements and adjust.

sa71

Current sentiment in the gold miners ZERO (0). The recommended allocation is Zero. Contrarians take note but you better have a strong stomach in the near-term.

bpgdm7year021114

But what you need to focus on is not so much the nominal price but the REAL price of gold.  15% or more of the costs of a mine are energy based.

gold to oil

That said, do your own thinking and use this as a case study of where to look for negative sentiment.   The question is…..are you being paid enough for the risks?

Can gold go to $800? Sure and Kinross and other miners will be closing down many of their operations or even going bankrupt. But consider what $800 gold would mean in a world choking on debt! Perhaps stocks might not hold up in a deflationary bust!  It is not just the gold price but the real gold price that matters to miners.  However, nominal gold prices in US dollars matter to miners that have debt denominated in US dollars.

Just never buy one miner because of the risks to any one company. Use the EXTREME price volatility to your advantage. Don’t buy the stock all at once. If you need to diversify and have limited capital, then SGDM might be a choice–IF you think owning miners is the lowest cost way to participate in either a deflationary bust or inflationary response by the Fed.  Otherwise, CEF (above) might be a cheap form of insurance to monetary mayhem.

Miners in a capitulation phase–crashing on huge volume–after four year price decline. Folks have had enough. Money managers in forced liquidation?

GDX

Some history

Just remember that you are trying to buy assets at extremely low prices since this is not a franchise. A mine is a DEPLETING asset.   How much money goes into a mine versus what is sold discounted by your cost of capital.

Obviously, with a cyclical asset you will find losses and the widest spread between price and financial operating metrics because a trough occurs in a bear market of declining product prices.  The reverse occurs at the top of a cycle–huge revenues and profits during the boom. So you MUST sell–this is a “burning” match not a franchise. Burn this into your brain.

What could go wrong with financial assets?

Paul Singer grits his teeth while holding gold during a monetary delusion

Paul Singer on “illogical” market trends: http://www.valuewalk.com/2014/11/paul-singer-q3-2014-letter/

I disagree with Mr. Singer because the bubble in confidence in central planning by the Fed means extreme trends.   For example, massive printing of money will cause LOWER gold prices because the market sees perpetual support of financial assets. Why own gold when equities will NEVER drop more than 10% in our lifetimes.  Thus, massive monetary intervention is bearish for gold. Of course, house prices could NEVER fall nation-wide and the Internet Bubble ushered in a new normal.  Timing is impossible. 

THIS IS WHAT IT FEELS LIKE TO OWN MINERS THIS PAST MONTH–Please no women or children to click on this link! http://youtu.be/82RTzi5Vt7w?t=1m52s

Gold, Inflation Expectations and Economic Confidence

Wednesday November 05, 2014 11:29

Below is an excerpt from a commentary originally posted at www.speculative-investor.com on 2nd November 2014. Excerpts from our newsletters and other comments on the markets can be read at our blog: http://tsi-blog.com/ 

As a result of what happened during just one of the past twenty decades (the 1970s), most people now believe that a large rise in “price inflation” or inflation expectations is needed to bring about a major rally in the gold price. This impression of gold is so ingrained that it has persisted even though the US$ gold price managed to rise by 560% during 2001-2011 in parallel with only small increases in “price inflation” (based on the CPI) and inflation expectations. The reality is that gold tends to perform very well during periods of declining confidence in the financial system, the economy and/or the official money, regardless of whether the decline in confidence is based on expectations of higher “inflation” or something else entirely.

Inflation expectations are certainly part of the gold story, but only to the extent that they affect the real interest rate. For example, a 2% rise in inflation expectations would only result in a more bullish backdrop for gold if it were accompanied by a rise of less than 2% in the nominal interest rate. For another example, a 1% decline in inflation expectations would not result in a more bearish backdrop for gold if it were accompanied by a decline of more than 1% in the nominal interest rate.

Other parts of the gold story include indicators of economic confidence and financial-market liquidity, such as credit spreads and the yield curve.

That large rises in the gold price are NOT primarily driven by increasing fear of “inflation” is evidenced by the fact that the large multi-year gold rallies of 2001-2006 and 2008-2011 began amidst FALLING inflation expectations. These rallies were set in motion by substantial stock market declines and plummeting confidence in central banks, commercial banks and the economy’s prospects. Even during the 1970s, the period when the gold price famously rocketed upward in parallel with increasing fear of “inflation”, the gold rally was mostly about declining real interest rates and declining confidence in both monetary and fiscal governance. After all, if the official plan to address a “price inflation” problem involves fixing prices and distributing “Whip Inflation Now” buttons, and at the same time the central bank and the government are experimenting with Keynesian demand-boosting strategies, then there’s only one way for economic confidence to go, and that’s down.

Since mid-2013 there have been a few multi-month periods when it appeared as if economic confidence was turning down, but on each occasion the downturn wasn’t sustained. This is due in no small part to the seemingly unstoppable advance in the stock market. In the minds of many people the stock market and the economy are linked, with a rising stock market supposedly being a sign of future economic strength. This line of thinking is misguided, but regardless of whether it is right or wrong the perception is having a substantial effect on the gold market.

For now, the economic confidence engendered to a large extent by the rising stock market is putting irresistible downward pressure on the gold price.

Steve Saville
http://www.speculative-investor.com/new/index.html

Reading the Financial News; Microdocumentary on Boom/Bust

As Gold Rises; Gold Miners Fall Down By Johanna Bennett

The price of gold may be rising, but gold mining stocks are getting hammered today. And do you know why?

They are still stocks.  (What does THAT mean?)

On the heels of yesterday’s late-day price surge, the Market Vectors Gold Miners ETF (GDX), of fell more than 4.5% amid a broader market selloff that sent the Dow dropping more than 300 points and the S&P 500 declining almost 2%.

The dovish minutes from the Federal Reserve’s September policy meeting have gold bugs buzzing. The precious metal touched a two-week high today, amid easing concerns that the Fed is near to raising interest rates, reviving gold as an inflation hedge.

Gold prices rallied to $1,234 a troy ounce, their highest level since Sept. 23, a day after minutes from the Fed’s September policy meeting revealed officials were worried weaker growth in Asia and Europe could curtail U.S. exports. The central bank also highlighted a stronger dollar as a barrier to U.S. inflation climbing toward the Fed’s 2% target, stoking hopes for a sustained period of low interest rates.

The most actively traded contract, for December delivery, was ended the day at $1,225.10 a troy ounce on the Comex division of the New York Mercantile Exchange, up $19.10, or 1.59% after earlier today climbing as high as $1,380.

ETFs linked to the commodity prices saw little improvement today. The SPDR Gold Trust(GLD) rose 0.25% to $117.76, while the iShares Gold Trust (IAU) inched up 0.21%.

But while worries regarding a weak economy can lift gold prices they can squeeze gold mining companies. GDX has plunged more than 60% over the past two years with the likes of Barrick Gold (ABX) falling more than 65% during that same time span and Newmont Mining (NEM) falling 59%.

The above is an article from an “elite” financial publication (Barrons) where the theme is that miners are being hurt/squeezed because they are stocks.  I ask my readers how are miners hurt LONG-TERM (the next decade) if the REAL price of gold is rising?  Sure miners may have been sold today due to leveraged investors selling to go into cash, but how does that “squeeze” the mining business if gold is risng RELATIVE to input costs like crude oil and commodities? Mining is a spread business. You make money on the spread between input costs and output revenues.  Never take what you read on face value.

gold oil

Gold commodities

 

gdxj gold

Miners realtive to gold in the chart above.

Four Boom and Bust Cycles and the Implications for today’s Cycle (Microdocumentary)

This microdocumentary video examines in detail 4 major booms in the last 100 years and explains how monetary policy and interest rate manipulation has led to the inevitable bust:

  1. The great depression of the 30ies
  2. The recession of the 90ies
  3. The dot com bubble
  4. The housing bubble

http://www.safehaven.com/article/35401/microdocumentary-the-truth-about-boom-and-bust-cycles   A bit simplistic, but a good introduction to the dangers of excess credit growth.

Rap Video on the Boom Bust Cycle or Hayek vs. Keynes

Buy What is on Sale! CEF Discounts

PITSelling today in the pits-gold and silver

CEF BIG

Above is a chart of CEF, Canadien Gold (60%) and Silver (40%) bullion closed-end fund trading at a 6.5% discount today. ON SALE!  I have no clue if tomorrow the price will be higher or lower.

http://www.cefconnect.com/Details/Summary.aspx?Ticker=CEF

Note the premiums as high as 10% and currently 6.5% discount.

4-Gold-sentiment-data

Learn more about interpretating sentiment indicators: www.acting-man.com

Long term sentiment

gold Sent 1

Silver Sent 1

HYGI Sent

A Great blog, Down the Rabbit Hole: http://biiwii.com/wordpress/2014/09/10/sentiment-shifting-gold-bugs/

Though, I like miners more, but now is a good time to pick up tangible money at a discount. Pay 94 cents and get a dollar of gold and silver today–I will take it.  SOLD!  Miners make money on the arbitrage between their input costs and output prices. You don’t need a rising nominal gold price; you need a rising REAL gold price.

gold.cci_-600x264 (2)

Gold commodities

Now is the time for me to post on Yamana (by this weekend, I pray) because it is at a price $7.33 that I have purchased in the past and it may be a reasonable choice for a BASKET of miners.

Also, you want to see analysts pile-on negatively AFTER price has fully dicounted the news. I am not being contrarian or cynical, it is just how markets work–they DISCOUNT.

Yamana Gold suffers rash of stock price target cuts • 12:58 PM

Carl Surran, SA News Editor
  • Yamana Gold (AUY -1.2%) is lower after Morgan Stanley, Credit Suisse and Raymond James cut their price targets on the stock to $10.70, $10.50, and $10, respectively.
  • In the case of Morgan Stanley, the lower target still implies upside of more than 40%; AUY has said the Pilar mine in Brazil has shown improvements with output increasing M/M, but the ramp up is tracking modestly below expectations, thus the firm’s tempered outlook.
  • An update on Canadian Malartic and meeting quarterly expectations are potential catalysts expected over the next 6-8 weeks.

Read comments

Read the link below and the link within it to gain more understanding on gold and miners.

http://www.acting-man.com/?p=32809 

Sentiment vs. Money Supply Growth; Find Cheap Options

Rydex-assets-the-mania

TMS-2-st-ann

Market Sentiment and Money Supply update: http://www.acting-man.com/?p=31559

James Grant’s Investment Approach (Video) June 12, 2014

Jim Grant: Buy Gold

Editor: Focus on how Mr. Grant approaches investing not necessarily the current object of his affections.

James Grant: “The Fed’s policy will inevitably fail because hyper-aggressive leveraged finance always seems to step in front of a bus.”

“Macro-economic forecasting is not a useful endeavor. It seems a better way is to consider the panoply of risks and then after having pondered them, look for mis-priced and cheap options on likely but uncertain outcomes.”

http://www.realclearmarkets.com/video/2014/06/12/jim_grant_buy_gold.html

[Note: Grant’s comments on gold begin at the 7:12 minute mark.]

“Gold is an example to me of an opportunity,” James Grant, editor of Grant’s Interest Rate Observer said in an interview this week. “[It] exhibits so many of the characteristics of a corpse, although it does occasionally toss and turn.”

“Gold stocks certainly look as if they were dead—but nobody even bothers to poke them with a stick.”

Gold is a cheap option on the failure of price control. Observe how the future is handicapped. We now have low levels of volatility and terrific embedded complacency. You will be paid well if the consensus makes a mistake. Invest in the monetary failure of an improvised monetary system run by tenured professors (Yellen).

Investing is when you want people to agree with you not now but in the future.

“Gold and gold mining shares are very, very cheap-and certainly widely detested options on the failure of this massive world-wide experiment, or the demonstration of the hopelessness of the technique of price control.”

HAVE A HAPPY FOURTH!

Fire or Ice: Our Economic Future

I disagree with a few of the speaker’s conclusions, but he lays out the history of how the U.S. left behind traditional capitalism where business saves and invests to drive growth to government controlled credit creation to drive consumerism (“creditism”). He says we are reaching our limits to expanding credit because of the lack of income growth. In other words, the Fed is trapped. The Fed MUST INCREASE QE or allow collapse.

Please view this if you have the time this weekend. An excellent video.

Here is his description: My Best Interview                                     April 25, 2014

For anyone who is interested in understanding my views on the global economic crisis, this is the video I would recommend watching, if I could only recommend one. In it, I am able to address almost all of the ideas I have tried to convey through my books and speeches over the past ten years.

The interview was organized, produced and conducted by Tim Verduin. Tim is the CEO of The Resilience Group, an insurance and financial services agency located in Crown Point, Indiana. I thought he asked all the right questions.

Have a Great Weekend.    We will tackle a gold stock valuation next week.

 

Compare and Contrast

MINERS-GOLD-RATIO-CHARTS-JUN-18

MINERS-INDEX-MONTHLY-LINEAR-CHART-JUN-18

TMS-2-long-term-dosh-slosh

The above represents my understanding of INFLATION, not prices rising. Prices may or not rise depending upon supply/demand for goods and currency. Usually, as the supply of currency increases much faster than the production of goods and services, then prices rise or the value of the currency declines.

World-stock-vs-GDP

inflation_jerryholbert

Thanks to www.acting-man.com and www.zerohedge.com

Free Seminar in NY on The Future of Money

The Future of Money: Bitcoin, the Gold Standard, and Free Banking
 
With the rise of Bitcoin and the continuing discussion of the gold standard as solutions to our current monetary woes, the Sound Money Project of the Atlas Network is organizing a reception and panel discussion on alternatives to the current monetary system. 
IS Bitcoin money?  Bitcoin-CMRE
 
Location:
Penn Club of New York
30 W 44th Street
New York, NY 10036
Time:
Tuesday, June 3, 2014
from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
 
Speakers:
Daniel Oliver, Committee for Monetary Research & Education
Lawrence H. White, George Mason University 
A representative from the Bitcoin Embassy, Canada 
 
Moderator: Gonzalo Schwarz (Atlas Network)
 
Heavy hors d’oeuvres and drinks will be served. The first 50 attendees to arrive will receive a copy of Notes on the Establishment of a Money Unit by Thomas Jefferson and with a forward by Atlas Senior Fellow Judy Shelton. 
 
For more information contact Brittany Cobb at Brittany.Cobb@AtlasNetwork.org or (973) 826-2003.
 

Dan Oliver graduated from Columbia Law School with honors in 2001 and practiced law at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett. He left Simpson Thacher to obtain an MBA from INSEAD in 2005. After co-founding two venture compnaies, Mr. Oliver joined Bearing Capital, LLC, a private equity firm in Buenos Aires focused on Latin American commodities investments. Mr. Oliver founded Myrmikan Capital in 2009, an investment firm specializing in micro- capitalized gold mining companies. Mr. Oliver is currently a Director of the Committee for Monetary Research & Education and a National Review Institute Fellow. 
 
Lawrence H. White is Professor of Economics at George Mason University. He specializes in the theory and history of banking and money, and is best known for his work on free banking. He received his A.B. from Harvard and his M. A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. He previously taught at New York University, the University of Georgia, and the University of Missouri – St. Louis.
In 2008 White received the Distinguished Scholar Award of the Association for Private Enterprise Education. He has been Visiting Professor at Queen’s University Belfast, Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University, Visiting Research Fellow and lecturer at the American Institute for Economic Research, visiting lecturer at the Swiss National Bank, and a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. He co- edits a book series for Routledge, Foundations of the Market Economy. He is a co-editor of Econ Journal Watch, and hosts bi-monthly podcasts for EJW Audio. He is a member of the board of associate editors of the Review of Austrian Economics and a member of the editorial board of the Cato Journal. He is a contributing editor to the Foundation for Economic Education’s magazine The Freeman and lectures at the Foundation’s annual seminar in Advanced Austrian Economics. He is an adjunct scholar of the Cato Institute and a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Institute of Economic Affairs.
Gonzalo Schwarz (moderator) manages the Awards and Grants program at the Atlas Network that include the prestigious Fisher Memorial Award and Templeton Freedom Awards.  Additionally he manages the Latin American Program. He currently holds an MA in Economics from George Mason University and is looking to pursue other graduate studies. He is originally from Uruguay and has lived in four other countries throughout his life. In the past he worked in academics and other non profits. He enjoys participating in academic seminars and was also part of the Koch Foundation Fall internship in 2009. His main hobbies are sports, reading and spending time with his family.
Have questions about The Future of Money: Bitcoin, the Gold Standard, and Free Banking? Contact Atlas Network
READING

TREASURE CHEST! A Value Analyst Pro; BITCOIN

POTHOLE

 

TREASURE CHEST

Introduction

Ecclesiastes tells us: “The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.” Myrmikan Research applies this principle to the subject of credit bubbles.

The ancient Greeks discovered that debt could magnify wealth. The debtor feels richer from the use of the borrowed property, while the lender feels richer from the compounding interest yielded by his claim. Both indulge in consumption more freely. As long as the accumulating claims remain contingent, the bubble grows. But, eventually, someone asks to be paid, and the expandingclaims on wealth must be reconciled to tangible wealth, much of which has been consumed.

The first recorded credit bubble popped in 594 B.C. Athens. Threatened with a civil war of creditor versus debtor, the Athenian ruler Solon pulled down the mortgage stones to free the debtors and devalued the drachma by 27% to relieve the bankers. Every credit collapse since – from the Panic of A.D. 33 to John Law’s Mississippi Bubble to the Great Depression and many others besides – has followed Solon’s template of debt default and currency devaluation.

“The natural remedies, if the credit-sickness be far advanced, will always include a redistribution of wealth: the further it is postponed, the more violent it will be. Every collapse of a credit expansion is a bankruptcy, and the magnitude of the bankruptcy will be proportionate to the magnitude of the debt debauch. In bankruptcies, creditors must suffer.” – Freeman Tilden, 1936

And against what is currency and debt devalued? Carl Menger, founder of the Austrian School of economics, was the first to explain that money is liquidity and that gold is the most liquid asset. Thus, gold has served as the reference point of value since the origins of money and is that against which currency must be devalued to relieve debts. Paper promises depreciate.

“The faith is lost. All with one impulse people rush to seize the gold itself as the only reality left—not only people as individuals; banks, also, and the great banking systems and governments do it, in competition with people. This is the financial crisis.”
– Garet Garrett, 1932

Myrmikan Research chronicles the collapse of the current, global credit bubble – the largest and broadest in history – analyzing current events from the perspective of Austrian economics and placing them in historical context.  Many links to books: http://www.myrmikan.com/research/

A Value Investor/Analyst, http://www.hacketts.com/  Click on Samples link on the left and read examples of company research. If you want to be a professional analyst, his research sets a high standard.  Note the format: Thesis stated right up front. He eats his own cooking too.

BITCOIN

Gavin Andresen, Chief Scientist of the Bitcoin Foundation, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about where Bitcoin has been and where it might be headed in the future. Topics discussed include competing cryptocurrencies such as Dogecoin, the role of the Bitcoin Foundation, the challenges Bitcoin faces going forward, and the mystery of Satoshi Nakamoto.

 

 

Investment Strategy

Gold-vs-Gold-Miners-Ratio

Client Report Jan 29 2014

gold vs spy  Gold is money, not an investment.

Value Investing Videos (Manual of Ideas)

https://www.youtube.com/user/manualofideas?feature=watch

Pabrai lectures in India: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Py95fWZV2Vo

Reader’s Questions

How much of your decision to not own stocks of businesses outside of the mining sector is based on a top-down or macro decision.  The reason that I as is because you mention that you owned COH in the past and that seems like a cheap stock at the moment.  I could understand that you might not want to own it because of it struggles in the US and possible brand erosion, but that seems more like a quality issue than a valuation issue.  Or is it a fear of a hurting consumer?

My reply: Actually, it is a bottom-up decision.  I have pawed through my 250 stocks that I target in Value-line but see little margin of safety. Yes, I owned COH many months ago but sold near $58 as I had about a $60 to $65 valuation on it.  I am very skeptical that the high end of their profit margins can be sustained because of their clientele and QE. But the undervaluations in miners gave me a better uses for my capital.  So bottom up on both sides push/pull. 

But I am certainly not suggesting anyone follow exactly what I am doing. I still own some non-miners like ESGR but I wouldn’t add to them. 
 
Question: Also, I’m still trying to understand the margin decline argument. I haven’t done enough homework on it myself to ask intelligent questions, but intuitively I don’t understand why a specific geography (in this case the US) couldn’t have more than average of the types of companies that generate higher margins.  The geographic lines on a map seem arbitrary to me.

My reply: Well, set aside geography, because the same principles apply to any country. The most mean reverting metric of companies in general would be profit margins.  Think about the inevitable law of competition and lack of barriers to entry.  But understanding this subject will make you a better investor and save you heaps of pain!  If an analyst projects an increase in multiples on top of today’s profit margins, then I suggest a mercy kill for that analyst and his boss/clients. We are in the death zone–a climber’s term for high altitude conditions. 

Cutting back on growth capex and returning excess capital to shareholders if there are no adequate opportunities to generate excess returns is the right thing to do, but how sustainable is it for large companies like IBM or CSCO? Also, buying stock today may not be below intrinsic value for every company that is doing it.